The ethics of translator

When most people think of ethics and professionals, they tend to focus on people like accountants, doctors, lawyers, or other high profile jobs.

The ethics of translator

Professional Engagement with Ethics 1. Incorporating Ethics in the Curriculum 3. Final Remarks and Recommendations 6. The growth of activity in higher education reflects the fact that translation and interpreting are now increasingly recognised as vital activities and an indispensable part of the professional and social landscape.

The Ethics of Machine Translation - Terminology Coordination Unit [DGTRAD] - European Parliament

They have become central to promoting cultural and linguistic diversity and developing multilingual content in global media networks and the audiovisual marketplace.

They have also become central to the delivery of institutional agendas in a wide range of settings, including supranational organisations such as the United Nations, the World Bank, the European Commission and the Football Association FIFAamong others, as well as cultural, judicial, asylum, healthcare and social work services at the national level.

Examples include new forms of assistive mediation such as subtitling for the Deaf and hard-of-hearing and audio description for the blind, both of which aim to facilitate access to information and entertainment for sensory impaired members of the community and are now taught either as full MA level degrees in their own right or as part of more generic degrees in Translation Studies.

Such rapid and far reaching changes in work environments have led to increased attention to questions of ethics in the academic literature on translation and interpreting in recent years ChestermanKoskinenJonesBermann and WoodGoodwinBaker and MaierInghilleriamong others.

The ethics of translator

These are discussed below in some detail. It requires every professional and every citizen to demonstrate that he or she is cognizant of the impact of their behaviour on others, aware of its legal implications, and prepared to take responsibility for its consequences.

While traditionally shielded from the consequences of their decisions by proclaimed values such as impartiality and neutrality which position them outside the interactions they mediate, translators and interpreters are now being held accountable for these consequences in ways that are forcing their educators to introduce more critical thinking and informed decision making into the curriculum.

The arrest and trial of Mohamed Yousry in the US in is a case in point. Mohamed Yousry, an Arabic translator and interpreter appointed by the court to assist in a terrorism trial, was convicted by a New York jury of aiding and abetting an Egyptian terrorist organisation U.

The charge wasbased on prison rules designed to prevent high-risk inmates from communicating with the outside world.

Yousry was held responsible for translating a letter from the defendant Sheikh Omar Abdel Ramanat the instruction of the attorney Lynne Stewartwhich Stewart later released to the press.

As Hess explains The case, and others that followed, reminded the profession that interpreters and translators can be held accountable not only for how they translate but also for the content, provenance and circulation of what they translate.

In more recent years, however, practising translators and interpreters have begun to challenge this image of their profession by voicing their opinions on a variety of issues and debating the question of ethics explicitly, often to the amazement of clients who continue to think of them as apolitical and unengaged.

Foreign Exchange Translations framed the poll as follows: We recently received the following email from a medical translator who has worked for a long-standing device client of ours: I offer my sincerest apologies, but I have to terminate my contribution to this project due to my collaboration with this boycott.

My timing is highly unfortunate. I realize this will affect our working relationship. I hope you can understand that had I known this earlier, I would have informed you appropriately.Ethics of a German translator. A translator resembles the role of an interpreter who has to report precisely what is said, whether agreeing with it or not.

A translator might have his or her own opinion on a subject but this should not affect accepting or rejecting a job.

Professional Translator Code of Ethics Babel University Professional School of Translation believes that the occupation of professional translation is valuable to society, and accordingly has established the following ethics and standards of behavior for professional translators.

An ethics of translation should be able to address moral dilemmas when they arise, but it should not exhume them unnecessarily.

The ethics of translator

Regimes and the training of translators The translator's profession can be approached from the outside, through the critique and distancing of alternative sources of authority. Ethics of a German translator A translator resembles the role of an interpreter who has to report precisely what is said, whether agreeing with it or not.

A translator might have his or her own opinion on a subject but this should not affect accepting or rejecting a job. Ethics? Translators don’t need to worry about ethics, do they?

When most people think of ethics and professionals, they tend to focus on people like accountants, doctors, lawyers, or other high profile jobs. Pragmatic ethics argues that the result of an action is more important than its intent.

La ética pragmática argumenta que el resultado de una acción es más importante que su intención.

The Ethics of Translation – Multilizer Translation Blog