Modern americas positive view of the california mission system instituted by the spaniards

Alta California mission planning, structure and culture[ edit ] Coastal mission chain, planning and overview[ edit ] Prior togrants of mission lands were made directly by the Spanish Crown. But, given the remote locations and the inherent difficulties in communicating with the territorial governments, power was transferred to the viceroys of New Spain to grant lands and establish missions in North America.

Modern americas positive view of the california mission system instituted by the spaniards

The article was entitled "American Acropolis" and dealt with the reconstruction efforts at the Old Stone Church, which is a part of the mission San Juan Capistrano.

I am particularly interested in why we continue to study the missions and what we can gain from the history. Kevin Starr argued that as California becomes increasing Latin we look to the missions as a symbol for the future.

If we are to take the words of Kevin Starr seriously, then history becomes a lens through which we can gauge our progress and see where we are going. In order to understand the importance of the missions to the California experience we must understand the many ways in which the mission space has been used.

I shall argue that it is in this multiplicity of uses that the mission continues to give definition to what it means to be Californian.

First off, the mission serves an educational purpose with a California initiative being enforced requiring every fourth grade student to complete a project on the missions.

Second, there is the obvious spiritual purpose of the mission space, which at several sites continues to be a place of worship.

Third, the mission in many respects was a place of social activism or at least a site of critique for social structures. This critique is evident in the art decorating the mission space.

The final and perhaps the most important use of the mission is precisely as an emblem for the authentication of the California experience. A revival in mission lore and a romanticized view of the mission gave a purpose to California as it came out of the boom of the gold rush and was confronted with the reality of competition with the eastern seaboard.

Beyond the Gold Rush, Californians struggled with a reason for their settling California. A view of the missions as a defining purpose for California developed at the end of the last century. By looking at the multiplicity of uses through both time and space of the California Mission, I believe we can understand why the missions continue to be studied and, furthermore, what the purpose of history really is, in the great equation of identity.

History tells us who we were so that we might better understand who we are becoming. In this manner, historical memory is essential to our understanding of our identity.

Introduction At the end of the last century, Frank W. Blackmar wrote a book entitled, Spanish Institutions of the Southwest. In it he described the rise and fall of the Spanish colonial system in the New World. Part of this system included missions established by brothers of various catholic orders ranging from the Dominican to the Franciscan and Jesuit.

At the end of the seventh chapter, which described the history of the California Missions, Blackmar wrote, "Some missions have crumbled to dust, others have been transformed in attempts to preserve them, and all will soon be forgotten in the new civilization of steam, and electricity; of free institutions and universal intelligence, the civilization wrought by wheat, fruit, and gold.

Blackmar was writing his thoughts on the impact of the missions at a time when many in California were looking towards the missions with rose-colored glasses.

InHelen Hunt Jackson published her novel, Ramonawhich romanticized life at that mission. Others would soon follow. In fact, a whole era of revivalist fervor sprang up. The California Digital Library and the University of California at Riverside have rather substantial collections of photographs taken of the missions between the years of The Missions remain a unique part of California and its heritage.

A revival in mission lore and a romanticized view of the mission gave a purpose to California as it came out of the boom of the gold rush and was confronted with the reality of . Upper California, the current State of California, was the last territory settled by Spain in the United States. The strategy for California was a model example of the Spanish frontier system: on one hand, a military expedition commanded by Gaspar de Portolá established a limited number of presidios securing the territory. The Spanish used the mission system to settle and protect its long and exposed frontier. The territory north of Mexico City was referred to as the Northern Frontier. The driving purpose (from the king’s perspective) was to protect and hold territory Spain had “discovered” and claimed.

They are as much a part of the California landscape as the Golden Gate Bridge. In fact, the Division on Tourism uses images of the facade of the Mission San Diego de Alcala as part of its promotion materials for that region.

In many other areas of life the missions hold a certain power and prestige. Many of the Missions still exist as parishes or even schools. Mission motifs are used in many of the buildings throughout California. Primarily, the denigrators of the Spanish Missions in California claim that the Franciscan friars destroyed the indigenous population through the introduction of disease and the use of corporal punishment.

At the beginning of the nineteenth century, a whole slew of writings and opinion circulated speaking to the destruction of indigenous cultures. This group of writing was known as the Black Legend.

Those sympathetic to the Franciscans claim that the friars were acting out of their own world view. Strong discipline was well within the scope of the Franciscan mindset. What is at stake here? Moreover, why is it important? I am arguing that history plays a critical role in the formation and verification of identity.

History helps us define our present state of being and predict where we are going. Benjamin Barber, author of Aristocracy for Everyone, writes "One generation engaged in a kind of time travel, visiting their forebears in order to steal a glimpse into the future, patterning their destinies on the template of the past.Sep 05,  · The more you read, the more you see that, during the last century, California's textbooks and newspapers have dramatically changed their descriptions of the Spanish mission system.

A revival in mission lore and a romanticized view of the mission gave a purpose to California as it came out of the boom of the gold rush and was confronted with the reality of .

Californio (historical, regional Spanish for Californian; plural: Californios) are the Hispanic residents native to California, who are culturally or genetically descended from the Spanish-speaking community which has existed in California since , of varying Criollo Spaniard, Mestizo, and Mexican American/Chicano origin.

South view of the town, with the church and mission-buildings of San Buena Ventura. A cavalcade of the Good Olden Times. F.G. Becher and Alfred Robinson, on a trip northward, with vaqueros and remonta from the Missn. of San Gabriel.

A revival in mission lore and a romanticized view of the mission gave a purpose to California as it came out of the boom of the gold rush and was confronted with the reality of competition with the eastern seaboard.

The encomienda system was one of the many horrors inflicted on the native people of the New World during the conquest and colonial eras. It was essentially slavery, given but a thin (and illusory) veneer of respectability for the Catholic education that it implied.

Modern americas positive view of the california mission system instituted by the spaniards
INDIANS of CALIFORNIA - Missionization